When Stan Lee wrote DC superheroes

When Stan Lee wrote DC superheroes
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Stan Lee passed away on Monday at the age of 95. The comic-book legend changed superheroes forever in the Golden Age of Comic Books. Even DC Comics, arch rival to Lee’s Marvel Comics, had to alter how their top-tier superheroes were written due to the Marvel legend.
He propped up the failing Marvel Comics and the company has not lost its lead ever since. It can be argued that Jack Kirby had more of an impact on comic-book characters, but it cannot be denied that Lee’s contribution was immense.
While Stan Lee’s work at Marvel — Spider-Man, the Avengers, Fantastic Four and so on — is very well-known, what is not so well-known is his work at DC. Sure, DC and Marvel have had a fractious relationship, which now extends to the cinematic universes. But Lee was one of the few comic-book creatives who was loved by both sides.
In 2001, Stan Lee re-imagined the most popular DC heroes. It was like how Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman and so on would have been like had Stan Lee got the chance to write them. This is how Lee’s DC trinity was like:
Batman: No Bruce Wayne here. Lee’s Batman was Wayne Williams, an African-American. Other things, though, are similar. This Batman is also rich, wears a bat-like costume and possesses advanced gadgets and weaponry. After his cop father is killed, he goes on a quest of vengeance. His “Batman” identity is the persona he adopts in wrestling. He never shows his real face to the audience.
Superman: Real name Salden, Stan Lee’s Superman is also a Kryptonian and a member of the Kryptonian Police Force. A criminal he captures takes himself and Salden to a blue-green planet called earth. The earth they arrive is too primitive and Salden assumes the mantle of Superman to fight the criminal who has become the head of a jungle tribe and also to rid the planet of its ills like poverty and war.
Wonder Woman: Not Diana, the princess of Themyscira, Lee’s Wonder Woman’s real name is Maria Mendoza and she is not a Greek goddess, but only a mortal. She is an activist and has been campaigning against the excavation of an Incan holy site near her village. The CEO of the firm that is excavating the site wants to gain the ancient power from the site’s artifacts and rule the world. He kidnaps Maria’s father and she arrives too late to save him. The CEO gains demonic powers. Maria, too, gains power, but a more benign kind from the Inca Sun God. The two fight in Los Angeles.