Guardiola says City, Liverpool have set new Premier League standards

+100%-

Manchester, April 26: Pep Guardiola says Manchester City and Liverpool have raised the bar in what is required to win a Premier League title after a blockbuster campaign by both teams.
If both sides win their remaining three games, Liverpool would finish the campaign on 97 points — the third-highest tally in the Premier League era — and still fail to end their 29-year wait for an English top-flight title because City would have 98.
It is a far cry from the 1996-97 campaign when Manchester United won the championship with just 75 points.
That means, according to Guardiola, that future champions will need to be aiming towards the magical century, which City achieved last season, to be assured of lifting the trophy.
“The standards we created last year at Manchester City, people know that you have to be close to 100,” he told reporters on Friday. “Before it was 90.
“This standard was last season, we helped Liverpool to achieve it this year and Liverpool helped us to keep going, so thanks to Liverpool we are competing.
“Liverpool know that to win you have to make a lot of points. That’s what we communicate to anyone.
“Next season, Chelsea are getting better, Man United, Tottenham. At the end when you are 25 points above United, 22 points ahead of other ones, if they want to stay there you have to improve the standard. It was easier before, everyone can lose to anyone.”
Solskjaer confident that Pogba will stay at Man United
Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is confident that Paul Pogba will still be at Manchester United next season but admits he cannot guarantee the French World Cup winner will stay.
Pogba fuelled speculation linking him with a move to Real Madrid last month, suggesting Real were “a dream club for any player”, although he declared at the time he was happy at Old Trafford.
Both manager Solskjaer and United’s board want their £89 million ($115 million) club-record signing to stay, although they have acknowledged that circumstances could change. (AFP)