Monday, June 24, 2024
Infotainment

David Seidler: Oscar-winning screenwriter of ‘The King’s Speech’, dies at 86

David Seidler

Renowned screenwriter David Seidler, best known for penning the acclaimed film The King’s Speech, passed away at the age of 86. Seidler’s manager, Jeff Aghassi, confirmed that the London-born writer died while indulging in one of his greatest joys ~ fly-fishing in New Zealand. Aghassi remarked that Seidler couldn’t have scripted a more fitting end for himself, being in the place he cherished the most.

The King’s Speech, released in 2010, depicted the inspiring true story of King George VI’s battle with stuttering, aided by his speech therapist Lionel Logue, played by Geoffrey Rush. Drawing from his own childhood struggle with stuttering, Seidler crafted a touching narrative that resonated with audiences worldwide. The film swept the 2011 Academy Awards, earning accolades for Best Picture, Best Director (Tom Hooper), Best Actor (Colin Firth) and Best Original Screenplay, which was awarded to Seidler himself.

Beyond The King’s Speech, Seidler’s creative footprint extended to various projects, including writing for Francis Ford Coppola’s Tucker: The Man and His Dream and contributing to animated features like Madeline: Lost in Paris and Quest for Camelot. His dedication to storytelling remained unwavering, with several documentaries, limited serie, and feature films in development at the time of his passing.

Aside from his professional achievements, David Seidler leaves behind a legacy of love and family. He is survived by his children, Marc and Maya, who undoubtedly carry on his passion for storytelling.

In addition to its cinematic success, The King’s Speech transcended the silver screen, inspiring a stage adaptation that captivated audiences across continents, including a notable run at London’s prestigious West End.

David Seidler’s contributions to the world of film and his unwavering commitment to his craft will be remembered fondly, ensuring his legacy endures for generations to come.

(Courtesy: TS)

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